Marine Board Seeks Public Comment on Statewide Rules for Slow–No Wake, Waterway Markers

marineboard:

Written public comments will be accepted until the end of a public hearing on April 21, at 6 pm. Oral testimony will be accepted during the hearing. Weigh in on whether a speed limit should be attached to Slow -No Wake definition, and how OSMB should handle waterway markers. The Marine Board is expected to convene a Board meeting and make a decision on the proposed rules.

Originally posted on Boat Oregon!:

Universal Slow-No Wake Sign Universal Slow-No Wake Sign

The Oregon State Marine Board is accepting written public comment beginning April 1, through April 21, on proposed rulemaking for Slow–No Wake and Waterway Markers. Staff will host a public hearing on April 21, 2015, at 6:00 pm, at the Marine Board Office, 435 Commercial Street NE, in Salem. Following the close of the hearing, the Marine Board will convene a Board meeting to discuss the proposed rules. The Board may make a motion to adopt, amend, not adopt, or take some other action with regard to the proposed rules.

The proposed rulemaking to OAR Chapter 250 will add a definition of “slow–no wake,”  amend the basic rule to comply with the definition, and amend the local and special area rules to standardize the rule language and remove the reference to “maximum” and “5 mph” in relation to slow-no wake speed.

The proposed rulemaking for waterway…

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Early Boating Safety Reminders for Open Water

On 4-12-15, paddlers Mandy Walkley and Jacob Austin lost their lives on Dungeness Bay (WA) when the weather quickly turned and their canoes capsized.

On 4-12-15, paddlers Mandy Walkley and Jacob Austin lost their lives on Dungeness Bay (WA) when the weather quickly turned and their canoes capsized.

WA Canoe Fatalities -ACA Interview on being prepared -Chris Spec

The Oregon State Marine Board, American Canoe Association, and Washington State Parks reminds boaters to do three important things this time of year if you plan to head out onto open waters:

1.  Wear a properly fitting life jacket for your activity.  Paddling-specific life jackets are available and provide enough buoyancy to keep your head and chest above the water.  There are many designs and styles that do not restrict movement.  The old “Mae West” horse collar style are long gone.

2. Expect to get wet.  Planning for the weather and being prepared makes a difference.  Prepare for the water temperature, NOT the air temperature.  When boating in open water or a large waterbody, the wind and conditions can change instantly, so wear a wet suit or dry suit in addition to your life jacket.  Cold water immersion is the number one cause for boating-related fatalities in the Pacific Northwest.

3.  Always paddle in pairs or in a group.  Also, have a whistle attached to your life jacket so you can signal members in your party where you are, in case you get separated.

We want you to have a wonderful experience out on the water.  It’s an amazing way to connect with nature, with your spirit, and get exercise.  Investing in proper gear is worth every penny…for the comfort and a more enjoyable time on the water.  Boat Safe.  Be prepared.  Plan ahead. 

 

WearItOregonAwarenessLogo

Presumed Japanese Tsunami Boat Apprehended At-Sea -Story from Lincoln Co. News

Partially submerged derelict boat located 2 miles off Seal Rock in Lincoln County, reported on April 9, 2015

Partially submerged derelict boat located 2 miles off Seal Rock in Lincoln County, reported on April 9, 2015

A derelict fishing boat was spotted earlier today about two miles off Seal Rock. Thinking it is a tsunami damaged boat, agents from Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Oregon State Police and Hatfield Marine Science Center motored out to inspect it.

When they arrived they realized the boat, which was covered with seaweed and algae, was broken in two. Only the bow area of the 50-footer was intact. And inside were fish tanks with yellow-tails in it – believed to have grown from larvae – which means they were in there for quite a while.

As for identifying the boat, investigators say they’re pretty sure it’s Japanese – possibly from the 2011 earthquake and tsunami. They say there are no definitive markings visible on the boat.

After a preliminary inspection of the boat remnants, HMSC Invasive Species researcher Dr. John Chapman determined that compared to earlier Japanese earthquake debris, this piece of debris was notably free of exotic species. As a result Port of Newport officials have volunteered to temporarily store the debris so that Chapman and his team can meticulously inspect the rest of it for any invasive species. Once that’s complete, what is left of the boat will be transported to a landfill and buried. The surviving Yellowtail fish are being donated to the Oregon Coast Aquarium.

Dr. Chapman says there is still an awful lot of 2011 Japanese Tsunami debris still spinning around in the gyres of the north Pacific. He said when strong southwesterly winds blow, the winds push debris circulating in those gyres toward the northeast and onto the shores of the western U.S.

In 2011, the Marine Board’s director, Scott Brewen, was appointed to lead an “At-Sea” subcommittee as part of the 2011 Governor’s Task Force on Tsunami Debris.  The agency was contacted early on and activated the At-Sea plan to prevent the boat from coming ashore.  Details are still being worked out on the best methods of containing any invasive species and removing the boat without causing any contamination to our waters.  More news to come as this story develops…

Article from Oregon Herald 4/9/15

Article from China Topix

Article from Beachconnection.net

Article from KPTV

The Japanese boat was removed from the water, pumped out, and dismantled on Monday, April 13, 2015.  The fish are in quarantine for a month and will later be added to the main tank at the Newport Aquarium.

http://www.kgw.com/picture-gallery/news/2015/04/10/photos-derelict-tsunami-boat-with-live-yellowtail-found-off-waldport/25585611/

 

 

Close Call Near Tou Velle State Park on the Rogue

A drift boat on the banks of the Rogue River in Jackson County

A drift boat on the banks of the Rogue River in Jackson County

Rogue River Guardians -Video Courtesy of the Medford Mail Tribune

Deputy Jason Denton takes the Medford Mail Tribune on a ride to show where three drift boaters had a close call on the Rogue River near Bear Creek.  Thankfully, all are SAFE, thanks to the Marine Patrol being at the right place at the right time, homeowner Vic Olsen aiding in the search for one of the boaters, and the observant patron who made the initial call into the Sheriff’s office when he saw debris floating in the river.

If your boat capsizes, remember to float on your back with your legs pointing downstream and don’t fight the current.  Use your arms as oars, and slowly maneuver to the bank.  Another tip is to carry your cell phone in a water-tight container like a DryPak.  Also, wear your life jacket.  It will help keep your head and chest out of the water, and give you the ability to gather your senses after the initial cold water shock.

Accidents can, and do happen.  Experience Oregon’s Waterways, and Play it Safe!

 

Marine Board Seeks Public Comment on Statewide Rules for Slow–No Wake, Waterway Markers

Universal Slow-No Wake Sign

Universal Slow-No Wake Sign

The Oregon State Marine Board is accepting written public comment beginning April 1, through April 21, on proposed rulemaking for Slow–No Wake and Waterway Markers. Staff will host a public hearing on April 21, 2015, at 6:00 pm, at the Marine Board Office, 435 Commercial Street NE, in Salem. Following the close of the hearing, the Marine Board will convene a Board meeting to discuss the proposed rules. The Board may make a motion to adopt, amend, not adopt, or take some other action with regard to the proposed rules.

The proposed rulemaking to OAR Chapter 250 will add a definition of “slow–no wake,”  amend the basic rule to comply with the definition, and amend the local and special area rules to standardize the rule language and remove the reference to “maximum” and “5 mph” in relation to slow-no wake speed.

The proposed rulemaking for waterway markers will describe the characteristics and standards for regulatory and informational markers (buoys and signs) used on the waters of this state that convey official messages to boat operators. Additionally, the rules will establish procedures for public bodies and individuals to apply for a permit to place approved waterway markers of their own (those markers not placed by the U.S. Coast Guard or the Oregon State Marine Board). These existing rules and definitions have been carefully considered and vetted by two external advisory committees and law enforcement marine patrol over the last two years.

The public is encouraged to submit written comments on the proposed rule language. The comment period closes April 21, 2015 at the Close of Hearing. Written comments are submitted by email to osmb.rulemaking@state.or.us  or by U.S. mail to: June LeTarte, Administrative Rules Coordinator, 435 Commercial Street NE, Suite 400, P.O. Box 14145, Salem, OR 97309-5056.  Comments will not be accepted by telephone.

To review the hearing notice and proposed rule language, visit http://www.oregon.gov/OSMB/Pages/admin/OSMB_Rulemaking_Newpage.aspx.

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City of Albany looks to replace Bowman Park restrooms

Reported by the Albany Democrat Herald, Kyle Odegard.

The Albany Parks and Recreation Department will apply for a grant from the Oregon Marine Board to replace the restroom building at Bowman Park.

The grant, if approved, would fund 75 percent of the project cost of nearly $116,000. The city would match 25 percent of the cost, which could include labor, equipment and materials.

-If awarded, the project could be completed this summer. “We’ll know by sometime in June whether we’ve been successful,” said Ed Hodney, Albany Parks and Recreation director.

The bathrooms, built thanks to a state grant, are more than 35 years old. The building is not connected to the parking lot with a paved path, is not wheelchair-accessible, and has problems with mold and mildew.

Hodney said the restrooms also are tucked back into the park and hidden from view, which leads to vandalism and other problems.

The new bathrooms would be adjacent to the parking lot, and be American Disabilities Act compliant.

Oregon Marine Board staff suggested the city apply for the grant, Hodney said.

“They had plans and drawings on their books. This has been a project identified by the Marine Board for quite some time,” he added.

http://www.cityofalbany.net/departments/parks-and-recreation/parks/parks

HB 2459 (Fee Bill) Hearing Scheduled

HB 2459, the Marine Board’s bill to increase certain fees related to registering and titling boats, floating homes and boathouses, has its first hearing on April 1, 2015.  The hearing will be heard by the House Committee on Transportation and Economic Development, in hearing room E, at 3 pm.

The Oregon State Senate Chamber in the State Capitol Building, Salem, Oregon

The Oregon State Senate Chamber in the State Capitol Building, Salem, Oregon

The Marine Board directed agency staff to engage boaters and gather input on agency-proposed fee increases in 2014.   Public notices and press releases were sent statewide to advertise public meetings that were held in the early summer.  Agency staff also attended conferences, club meetings, and stakeholder meetings to gather additional input.

The Board considered the feedback from the public meetings and factoring in other economic projections, the Board approved a fee structure that ultimately developed into a legislative concept.  This concept became HB 2459.

The agency has not raised fees since 2003 (12 years), and other fees since 1978.

The links below are documents provided to legislators, partners, and stakeholders to educate them on the reasoning behind this fee bill.

HB 2459 

Statewide Public Meetings Synopsis

HB 2459 One-Pager for the Oregon Legislature

Neighboring States Cost Comparisons for Recreational Boating

These fee increases are needed in order to maintain current service levels and carry the agency’s business operations for another 6 years.  Through the strategic planning initiatives currently being implemented, more engagement and participation from boaters are being woven into the fabric of the agency, so the Marine Board can truly be your boating agency.

Mission Vision & Values of the Oregon State Marine Board

 

 

Obstruction at the Wallace Marine Park Boat Ramp

Debris accumulation at the Wallace Marine Park Boat Ramp.

Debris accumulation at the Wallace Marine Park Boat Ramp.

During this past winter, a partially submerged log became lodged at the last piling of the Wallace Marine Boat Ramp in Salem, on the Willamette River.

The log remains, and other debris has accumulated.  The obstruction is highly visible and has been marked by marine patrol deputies.  It was hoped that winter high water would dislodge the tree, however, the high water didn’t arrive.  Boaters are urged to motor to port (their left side) as soon as possible after launching to avoid the current potentially carrying them into the tree and debris.

We’re continuing to monitor this obstruction and are working with our agency partners on potential options for relocation/removal.

Spring Start-up Checklist from Discover Boating

Here’s Your Spring Start-up Checklist

Click here to download this article as a printable checklist.

•Check all fluid levels including engine oil, power steering, power trim reservoirs and coolant.

•Check all fluid levels including engine oil, power steering, power trim reservoirs and coolant.

Spring has sprung and for millions of boaters in the U.S. that means it’s time to take their boats out of winter storage and put them in the water. For many boaters, annual preparation and cleaning projects are necessary rites of spring that help prevent problems that could keep them off the water once the season is underway.

Fuel System

  • Inspect the fuel system for leaks or damage and be sure to pay special attention to fuel hoses, connections and tank surfaces.
  • Evidence of a damaged fuel hose includes softness, brittleness or cracking.
  • Replace components when necessary and verify all fittings and clamps are properly secured.
  • Ensure the engine, exhaust and ventilation systems are all functioning properly.
  • Look before you pump. Don’t fill your tank with fuel that contains more than 10% ethanol (E10) as it will damage your engine

Belts, Cables & Hoses

  • Check belts, cables and hoses because they can become brittle and may crack during winter storage.
  • Belts should fit tightly around pulleys to prevent slipping.
  • A worn belt may leave a black residue near the pulley and will fit loosely.
  • Cracks or swells on the outer jacket of throttle, shift and steering control cables may be of internal corrosion and immanent failure

Electric System

  • Inspect all electrical connections for clean, tight, corrosion free connections. Corroded connections can be dangerous
  • Remove corroded terminals and use a wire brush to clean them, along with all cable ends.
  • Charge your battery and have it tested to ensure it can hold a charge.
  • Electrical systems should be regularly inspected by a qualified technician.

Fluid Levels

  • Check all fluid levels including engine oil, power steering, power trim reservoirs and coolant.
  • Be sure to change the engine oil, oil filter and drive lubricants if these tasks were not done prior to winterizing your boat.

Propellers & Hulls

  • Inspect propellers for dings, pitting, cracks and distortion.
  • Damaged propellers can cause unwanted vibration and damage to your drive train.
  • Make sure the propeller is secured properly, and replace bearings when needed.
  • When inspecting the hull, look for blisters, distortions and cracks. Be sure to clean the hull, deck, and topsides using an environmentally safe cleaning solution.
  • Also, make sure the drain plug is securely in place before every launch.

Safety Gear

  • Check your life jackets to ensure they are in good condition and that there are enough on board for all potential passengers.
  • Ensure that each individual has the correct size life jacket for their body weight.
  • Be sure all onboard fire extinguishers are the correct class for your vessel, and are fully charged and stowed in the proper place.
  • For any enclosed or semi-enclosed area, ensure you have at least one properly installed and working carbon monoxide detector and consider purchasing a smoke detector
  • Consider an EPIRB for situations of distress to ensure you can be found -especially when operating in the open ocean
  • Take advantage of any safety inspections offered by your local marine patrol, US Coast Guard (USCG), USCG Auxiliary or US Power Squadrons

Get the 2015 boating year off to a great start. Ensure you’ll enjoy another season of carefree boating and make your annual boat preparation more manageable.

For more resources about your boat, visit Discover Boating at http://bit.ly/1BR2BPh.

Now, go BOAT OREGON!

Communication Drill Exercise -US Coast Guard

MARSEC levels of threat to our Ports.

MARSEC levels of threat to our Ports.

We’re helping get the word out about any potentially dangerous situations to our state.  This is simply a communication drill:


—The United States Coast Guard Captain of the Port, Sector Columbia River is exercising a simulated increase of the MARSEC Level from Level One to Level Two. The intent of this exercise is to test Coast Guard and maritime security communications procedures and to verify contact information for port security stakeholders in the Captain of the Port Zone Columbia River.—

THIS IS A COMMUNICATION EXERCISE